Part 3 Expanse

Project 2 Landscape

Exercise 1 Cloud formations and tone

DSC_0222
Early morning clouds, Santiago CHILE

After watching the videos and studying the work of Vija Celmins, I was intrigued by the way with certain of her works they were executed over a long period of time. The piece of work would evolve and grow over time, and the artist’s mind and thought process might also change over the same period. A process similar to oil painting which also evolves over a relatively long period of time – waiting for paint to dry etc. Whilst the paintings appear still they have a sense of depth and also one of infinity – time that does not stop. Stars appear and disappear, they grow brighter/duller, they move very fast but appear slow – there is so much to capture in just a simple (or seemingly so) subject matter. The universe is constantly moving like her waves another subject with a surface that defies capture, defies taming and suprises nature itself with its power that has a range from tranquillity to a force so destructive it can change our maps forever.

Clouds are constantly moving, forming, dissolving into space – they have a smell and form a damp humid atmostphere – for instance walking or driving on a mountain road in cloud you can experience the sense of capturing or living in the cloud.

This exercise was both frustrating and in a way thrilling – a chance to experiment and to really see if one understands the use of tone or line to represent a three dimensional object even as fleeting as a cloud!

Small sketchbook studies using line…

DSC_0768DSC_0767

Cloud mark-making using a twig with indian ink/water…

DSC_0774

Experimenting with mixed media/brush using tone…

These studies using a brush were quick but frustratingly unsuccessful.

Thinking about a bigger study and using John Virtue’s London paintings as a guide, I made a cloud study experimenting with a different support…gessoed brown wrapping paper which I had to stretch as it got wetter. This paper is extremely delicate when wet! I then made the cloud study using compressed charcoal:

_20171008_085449
Evening cloud study. Compressed charcoal on gessoed brown paper (100 x 80 cm)

In this drawing I have captured movement, perspective and form whilst achieving a full tonal range (although this was a little dampened by the application of fixative after taking this photo).

The support is fragile and brittle – and I am now frightened of removing it from the board – it cannot be rolled up and will have to be mounted on card.

Exercise 2 Sketchbook Walk

This for me was a actually a bike ride not a walk. I used a small sketchbook and a fineline biro.

DSC_0679

This Polo Club is source of inspiration for me and I look forward to seeing/sketching the horses/riders in action soon. I sketched reasonably quickly trying to incorporate as much detail as possible but trying to create an atmosphere as well – the club house is a restaurant and is actually dwarfed by the mountains and polo fields – although this is not captured in my sketch.

DSC_0680

The horse paddocks with mountains in the background has great potential with horses in the foreground, stable blocks and trees in the middleground with mountains and clouds in the background.

DSC_0681

I was actually going to make a completely different sketch at this spot but liked the dead tree trunk to use as a frame for the fields, far off buildings and mountains.

DSC_0687

I have ridden past this spot many times and was interested in the wooden fruit tree supports that have been left to rot in this abandoned field. The pattern of the supports is repeated in the very large imposing pylons that cross the field. Not sure what the yellow plant is that has invaded this field – perhaps rape seed – it will not be there for long as the hot summer sun will destroy it until next year. This has a potential to develop further and with an architectural feel to the pylons is an opportunity for me to explore the style and methods of Julie Mehretu? Perhaps on Mylar if I can get some.

In the meantime I took lots of photos of the field from many angles and made a watercolour sketch (on a very overcast cold day):

DSC_0779

Anuncios

Part 3 Expanse

Project 2 Landscape

Research Point – Artists who use landscape as their main subject

Albrecht Durer (1471-1528) was not on my list of artists that I recognise as a landscape painter- so as one of the earliest to use landscapes in his work I researched a little into his studies in watercolour and ink: His ‘View of Trento, Watercolour and gouache on paper (1494) was a lovely study where he has simplified the trees and mountains – which maybe useful for me drawing the Andes mountains near where I live. He has a very clear Foreground, middleground and background.

the-city-of-trento-1495

The other work I picked out was his ‘View of Innsbruck’ Watercolour on paper (1495)

I liked this watercolour because of its simplified clouds, and reflections in the water – very cleverly and delicately painted!

My HERO of landscape painting has always been John Constable ((1776-1837) evr since I saw his ‘The Hay Wain’ at the National Gallery at the age of 14. I loved the immense detail of his paintings, the small details such as shepherds and people going about their rural business. Small touches of red in perhaps a coat or a cart, birds flying in the sky, wonderful cloud detail, wind rain and storm also starred in his awesome landscapes. John Virtue in his tour of the National Gallery was also impressed by Constable’s bold courageous brushstrokes.

Constable made several studies of this view of ‘Dedham from Langham’. In both versions above there are very clear Foreground, Middleground and Background elements. I believe that he was a master of simplification of the landscapein what were landscapes ahead of their time…such as ‘Summer, Afternoon after a shower’ Oil on Canvas (1828) and ‘A rain storm over the sea’ Oil on canvas (1834).

Jean Camille Baptiste Corot (1796-1875) is another landscape artist that I deeply admire.  Some of his delicate drawings of trees are a joy and I love the details of people and animals strategically placed within his landscapes.  Examples are ‘Lanscape with three figures’ Oil on canvas (1850-60) and ‘Pastures in the Marais’ Oil on canvas (1865-70.

jean_baptiste_camille_corot_b1147_paturage_dans_les_marais_small

I made a couple of small copies in pencil of these paintings:

About 7-8 years ago I was lucky to be able to visit the Lowry Centre in Manchester. From this visit I obtained a book which I subsequently read on the life and works of Lowry by Shelley Rhohde. LS Lowry (1887-1976) like George Shaw painted and sketched the life and scenes around him – but unlike Shaw, Lowry formed his own style of painting (not realistic) – at the time not recognised as a serious painter he did not achieve success from his work until the latter part of his life. He painted the monotonous life of the worker going to and from the factories – ‘Our town’ Oil on Canvas (1943) and the daily life of for instance ‘An arrest’ Oil on canvas (1927):

Among his more emotional paintings, I really admired his ‘The Lake’ Oil on Canvas (1937) part of his black series – painted after the death of his father. The image below does not do justice to the real painting:

images

A painting about death…human death in the graveyard (foreground detail), the dark and polluted lake (middleground) and the death creating factories in the backgound belching out black smoke. This image is very similar to that on P62 of the course – Drawing by James Lloyd.

In my sketchbook studies to follow, I want to have in mind the studies of Corot and Constable and look for little details in the landscape that could bring life and realism to my drawings.

 

Rainy Day!

Rainy Day!

After weeks without rain, I planned a day of sketching outside for Part 3 for today…..BUT  it began to rain in the morning and is still raining!

After checking social media and other trivia, I sketched the window and doodled for a while…

dsc_0650.jpg

Then I watched some very interesting videos on YouTube of the artist/sculptor Kiki Smith from the USA. She is a compulsive artist who follows the path of her work and lets it flow without really setting any objectives first. I say compulsive because watching and listening to her she works from home – her living space is also where she finds inspiration, a peaceful space to work and be creative.  She works in whatever medium suits her work – sculpture, photography, drawing, printing, fabrics, glass among many other mediums.

Checkout Tate Shots on Kiki Smith:

and Kiki Smith – Path:

This is an incredible example of letting your imagination and work leading you down a particular creative path.  Her exhibition Path made me realise that there are no boundaries between drawing, textiles, sculpture, printing etc – the limit is you if you let it!

DSC_0651

Then I read ‘The value of dreaming’ blog by Neal Musson on the OCA Student Blog and I felt that they were related in that he makes up a word – a creative space …. “dreamspace; The return to fabric and the things I haven’t made’.…… ‘To allow the creative mind to wander ambitiously without boundaries’….”

Not a bad morning exploring, drawing, listening and thinking whilst the rain continues to fall outside.

 

Assignment 2 Feedback

Assignment 2 Feedback

Reflection on formative feedback – Part 2

You have produced an interesting and varied range of project exercises that
demonstrate a confident handing of a range of media. Most of these studies work better than your final piece. Your sketchbook and learning log need to be developed further to support and enhance your progress…..

……I have had to be quite negative about your final piece but there is enough evidence elsewhere in this assignment, that you are developing good drawing skills and a more confident handling of media. Keep building on this and develop a greater awareness of tonal values.

The feedback I received on Part 2 was interesting, encouraging and the basis for more work ahead.

Positive comments and encouragements included:

“Still life using line….the charcoal study of the vase of flowers and the Raoul Dufy inspired piece….have an energy and sense of movement through variation of mark making and fluidity. For the charcoal piece you are exploring the qualities of the medium and combining direct, expressive marks with more delicate areas. Similar techniques are being employed for the ink study”

“Still life in tone. Your still life using pastel is vibrant and on the whole you have handled the media well, keeping the colour clean and intense…..It would be good to see you try and retain the vibrancy of colour but be more mindful of tonal contrasts”

“Mixed Media.  Aspects of this study work very well – the eggs and lemons in the blue basket are well rendered with a convincing sense of surface texture and confident handling of mixed media. The two lemons in the foreground are also very sensitively executed, again with a subtle surface texture achieved through carefully combining media. There is no overworking here

“Monochrome……There is potential here and I do like the area of repeated linear
detail behind the eggs …..I think your challenge might be to combine your interest in materials and mark making with more rigorous observational drawing skills – making more quick sketches and really looking at the subject”

“Material differences. Your study of the living room does work quite well in terms of composition and where you use colour it has an intensity that almost appears to glow. This is emphasised further by the contrasting black pen marks”

I thoroughly enjoyed this part of the course especially the still lifes and experimented with media that I had never previously used or used very little, so I was pleased with the above comments. I have highlighted (in bold) the strengths that I must enhance further by more experimentation/practice in the following exercises and in my sketchbooks. One very important point which was stated in the mixed media study was that I had not overworked the piece – whereas I personally thought I had gone too far! There is always a very fine line with overworking and sometimes it is personal taste, but a general theme throughout the feedback was a reliance on line and a general lack of tonal contrast (see negative feedback below) – for me it may also be a fear of overworking!

Negative feedback and improvements required:

“Still life using line…Instead of over emphasising the outline with black, try varying the tone more to include more darker shades of colour

“Still life in tone…..The overall effect is rather decorative, especially as the effect of the flowers against the background becomes almost like a flat pattern, due to the tones being so close

“Monochrome…… More careful observation would have helped you describe the form – the bowl doesn’t look quite accurate and again, there is a lack of shadow at it’s base”

“Material differences….outlines should not not be relied upon too much. There can be a tendency to get a little bit lazy with mark making when using pen because it gives such an immediately satisfying quality of line. For instance, the lines around the sofa or those used to describe the curtains – they are quite fluid and expressive but at the same time, they do sit on the surface a little. Like I say, overall this is quite a good drawing but I am mentioning outline again, not because I want you to stop using it but because I don’t want it to be used at the expense of tone where that would be more effective. This is an interesting area for you to work with as you continue – exploring tonal variation rather than containing/describing objects with outline”

“Final piece. I have to say this is probably the least successful drawing that you have produced for this assignment……Overall, this drawing lacks coherence and depth due to a very limited tonal range and a lot of slightly fussy detail that has not been rendered with the sensitivity you have demonstrated in previous studies. It is a very complicated arrangement and you have tried to describe the different aspects with a range of media – this has led to some overworking. Oil pastel can be quite crude and difficult to manipulate, particularly on this scale and with this amount of detail.
A lack of definition and contrast means that it is actually slightly confusing and difficult to read…..It is important to remember to keep looking at your subject and notice all the subtleties without taking anything for granted. If you want to make another study of this arrangement, I suggest you just look at a section of it and crop it, make a larger piece of work in pencil, ink or watercolour. Keep the colour vibrant and remember tonal contrast”

After finishing Assignment 2, I realised that working from a poorly lit photograph (no excuse as I have previously studied photography to NVQ4 level!!) and working directly from a computer screen to paper in the evening in my study was not a good method of working. In looking at the arrangement first hand with my own eyes it was clear that the lighting needed to be improved and direct sketches made to use on the final piece. I had also decided on a composition without fully exploring the potential of the subject/s being included – an element that had already been studied during the previous exercises! It is therefore important to note that a successful outcome relies on a considered combination of many elements – subject matter/context, feeling/mood, tonal contrast (well lit subject), expressive use of line, texture, composition, appropriate use of colour, among other considerations…..very much like conducting an orchestra but playing all the instruments at the same time solo! This requires more concentration, practice, experimentation and commitment.

Rework of Assignment 2

An important message from within the feedback was the importance of tonal contrast, so I referred to the section on tonal scales in Experimental Drawing and practiced a little before reworking the assignment:

 

I needed to think more on composition and tonal contrast, and also about the lighting of the subject and if using a photo to work from – to use a good quality print.

The following two pieces were completed from good quality photos taken with good directional lighting – the first in charcoal working from a dark tone and erasing to find the lighter tones, then finally recovering the very dark tones.  The composition was a close crop of two of the bears in the original study.

DSC_0595

Whilst this drawing included a full range of tones, the drawing is flat because I studied the tones and not form!

DSC_0633

In this drawing I used colour and achieved a greater sense of depth and form using tone. I started by building up the tones first and then added the lines. I finished by achieving  a greater range of tone using bold ink for the hats and shadows and then increased the tonal range of reds and yellows. This was a much more succesful drawing but my ink mark making was a little restrained due to my fear of making a mistake on top of my tonal background! I still have a lot of practicing ahead to gain more confidence in using a full range of tones together with expressive mark making.

Sketchbooks and learning log

These are major areas for me to improve particularly the use of sketchbooks in general exploration/experimentation of media and compositional studies.  I need to use the sketchbook to develop an idea to a final piece – clearly showing my inspiration and thought processes.

Critical review of artists and art should include  digging deeper into my own thoughts and reflections…..and to ensure that my written research also investigates different ideas and processes employed by a wide range of artists.

Suggested reading/viewing

“Look at the drawings, etchings and watercolours of contemporary painter George
Shaw. He is more famous for his paintings in enamel but his monochrome works depict an eerie sense of alienation within the landscape.

Also look at the variety of mark making in the abstract drawings by Julie Mehretu and
the angular and expressive quality of line in the work of Egon Schiele. Claude Heath
makes drawings that have an active, energetic quality that might inspire you to explore a more animated approach.”